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May 19, 2003 - D



Ethics & Philosophy


Selected Quotations from Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics
Part I

...If, then, there is some end of the things we do, which we desire for its own sake (everything else being desired for the sake of this), and if we do not choose everything for the sake of something else (for at that rate the process would go on to infinity, so that our desire would be empty and vain), clearly this must be the good and the chief good. Will not the knowledge of it, then, have a great influence on life?

...let him hear the words of Hesiod:

Far best is he who knows all things himself;
Good, he that hearkens when men counsel right;
But he who neither knows, nor lays to heart
Another's wisdom, is a useless wight.

...But it [honour] seems too superficial to be what we are looking for, since it is thought to depend on those who bestow honour rather than on him who receives it, but the good we divine to be something proper to a man and not easily taken from him.

...Now such a thing happiness, above all else, is held to be; for this we choose always for self and never for the sake of something else, but honour, pleasure, reason, and every virtue we choose indeed for themselves (for if nothing resulted from them we should still choose each of them), but we choose them also for the sake of happiness, judging that by means of them we shall be happy. Happiness, on the other hand, no one chooses for the sake of these, nor, in general, for anything other than itself.

...Happiness, then, is something final and self-sufficient, and is the end of action.

...if this is the case, and we state the function of man to be a certain kind of life, and this to be an activity or actions of the soul implying a rational principle, and the function of a good man to be the good and noble performance of these, and if any action is well performed when it is performed in accordance with the appropriate excellence: if this is the case, human good turns out to be activity of soul in accordance with virtue, and if there are more than one virtue, in accordance with the best and most complete.

...To entrust to chance what is greatest and most noble would be a very defective arrangement. (1)




Notes

[1] Aristotle "The Nicomachean Ethics" translated by W. D. Ross
Book 1
http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/nicomachaen.html
The Internet Classics Archive: http://classics.mit.edu/
Nichomachean Ethics also found here at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/